Key Lesson Audiences and Objectives

To influence people to take action, you have to communicate with your audiences strategically. In this lesson, you will learn that each communication should have a specific audience and objective in mind. Of course, you will develop objectives for each of your individual stories, but here we want to think about the bigger picture: Who does your organization want to communicate with, and what do you want them to do?

Audiences and Objectives: Who is your organization speaking to?

You may have many audiences, and that’s ok. Start by mapping them out and determining what your objectives are for each one (i.e. what you want them to do). This will allow you to communicate consistently with each of these audiences in ways that address your objectives. Voila, strategic communications!

So let’s start by mapping out your audiences and choosing objectives for each.

There are three key objectives in strategic communications, all of which are measurable: raising awareness, changing people’s attitudes, and motivating people to take action. When you choose your objectives, be specific: we want donors to give more money, we want thought leaders to understand our organization’s solution, we want to raise awareness with educators. The more specific your objectives, the more actionable they will be for your audiences.

2. What are your objectives for this group? How can they best help?

Select one

4. What are your objectives for this group? How can they best help?

Select one

6. What are your objectives for this group? How can they best help?

Select one

8. What are your objectives for this group? How can they best help?

Select one

10. What are your objectives for this group? How can they best help?

Select one

12. What are your objectives for this group? How can they best help?

Select one

Don’t stop working.

Defining your audiences and their objectives will help you in creating an effective storytelling strategy.

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Good Job!

You've defined who your organization needs to speak to and objectives for each of these audience groups.

Next up: Content

Your Narrative Framework

People

People you serve:

Your supporters:

The most important way this group can help you advance your cause:

The geographic makeup of your supporters:

Long-Term Goals

Problem

Solutions

Call to Action

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